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Saturday, August 17, 2019

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The most common reason many people have to change a network type is because they want to create or join a HomeGroup.
Or something changed on the adapter
If you want to use a HomeGroup, every computer needs to be on a home network. You can use the same process for changing any network type.


  1. Choose Start→Control Panel and, under the Network and Internet heading, click the View Network Status and Taskslink.

    Windows shows you the Network and Sharing Center.

  2. In the box marked View Your Active Networks, click the link that mentions the network type you now have.

    image0.jpg
  3. In this case, we’ll click the Public Network link to change a public network to a home network, so we click the Public Network link. Windows shows you the Set Network Location dialog box.

  4. Choose the type of network you want to use. In this case, click Home so we can create a HomeGroup.

    image1.jpg
  5. The Set Network Location dialog box closes. When you switch to a home network type, Windows invites you to either start a new HomeGroup or, if a HomeGroup exists, join it.

Home network:
For home networks or when you know and trust the people and devices on the network. Network discovery is turned on and computers on a home network can belong to a homegroup.
Work network:
For small office or other workplace networks. Network discovery is on by default allowing you to see other computers and devices on the network and allows other users to see your computer. However, you can't create or join a homegroup.
Public network:
For networks in public places like as coffee shops or airports. This setting keeps your computer from being visible to other computers around you and to help protect your computer from any malicious software.

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